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First and second trimester urinary metabolic profiles and fetal growth restriction: an exploratory nested case-control study within the infant development and environment study

  • Gauri Luthra3Email author,
  • Ivan Vuckovic1,
  • A. Bangdiwala2,
  • H. Gray3,
  • J. B. Redmon4,
  • E. S. Barrett5,
  • S. Sathyanarayana6,
  • R. H. N. Nguyen7,
  • S. H. Swan8,
  • S. Zhang1,
  • P. Dzeja1,
  • S. I. Macura1 and
  • K. S. Nair9
BMC Pregnancy and ChildbirthBMC series – open, inclusive and trusted201818:48

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-018-1674-8

Received: 24 February 2017

Accepted: 28 January 2018

Published: 8 February 2018

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
24 Feb 2017 Submitted Original manuscript
1 Jun 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Anna Maria Paoletti
29 Jul 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Olivier Claris
4 Dec 2017 Author responded Author comments - Gauri Luthra
Resubmission - Version 2
4 Dec 2017 Submitted Manuscript version 2
15 Jan 2018 Author responded Author comments - Gauri Luthra
Resubmission - Version 3
15 Jan 2018 Submitted Manuscript version 3
Publishing
28 Jan 2018 Editorially accepted
8 Feb 2018 Article published 10.1186/s12884-018-1674-8

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
(2)
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
(3)
Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
(4)
Division of Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism, Minneapolis, USA
(5)
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, USA
(6)
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, USA
(7)
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
(8)
Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
(9)
Metabolomics Core, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Saint Mary’s Campus, Rochester, USA

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