You are viewing the site in preview mode

Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 2 Participants’ experience with third- and fourth-degree obstetric lacerations

From: Nurse-midwives’ ability to diagnose acute third- and fourth-degree obstetric lacerations in western Kenya

  Prevalence
Routinely perform rectal exams on all patients after delivery (n = 20) 2 (10.0%)
Perceive a good understanding of the muscles that can be damaged during delivery (n = 21) 11 (52.4%)
Previous training in perineal tear evaluation (n = 22) 14 (63.6%)
Previous training specifically in third- and fourth-degree tear evaluation (n = 22) 4 (18.2%)
Comfortable repairing a third- or fourth-degree tear (n = 22) 0 (0.0%)
Reported evaluation of tears after delivery was challenging (n = 22) 20 (90.9%)
Specific challenges to perineal evaluation following delivery (Open Response) (n = 22)
 Staff shortage / workload 13 (59.1%)
 Inadequate or broken supplies 12 (54.5%)
 Deliveries occurring at night 9 (40.9%)
 Inadequate light source 8 (36.4%)
 Lack of pain control 1 (4.5%)
Distance in km to nearest referral center for complex repair (excluding providers based at a referral center) (n = 16) 25.3 ± 10.8
 Distance ≤ 10 km 2
 Distance 10-20 km 2
 Distance >20 km 11
 No response 1
Participants with system to follow-up on patients who have been referred for repair (n = 20) 12 (60.0%)